• Articles
    • Views
    CONTRIBUTOR

    Doris V. Sutherland

    Horror historian, animation addict and tubular transdudette. Catch me on Twitter @dorvsutherland, or view my blog at dorisvsutherland.wordpress.com. If you like my writing enough to fling money my way, then please visit patreon.com/dorvsutherland.

Author's Posts

  • The Vampyre’s Legacy, Part 4: Carmilla and Company

    The Vampyre’s Legacy, Part 4: Carmilla and Company1

    The previous installment of this series covered attempts to deconstruct vampire fiction during the mid-nineteenth century, with writers stepping back and seeing how vampirism could serve symbolic purposes. As the century headed towards its close, the time was right for the vampire to be reconstructed once again. With the more analytical works out of the

    READ MORE
  • Jungle Girls: Lions and Tigers and Bare Midriffs, Oh My!

    Jungle Girls: Lions and Tigers and Bare Midriffs, Oh My!0

    Jungle Girls Various (writers/artists), Mitch Maglio and Craig Yoe (editors), Dr. Sheena Howard (introduction) Yoe Books/IDW February 12 2019 Imagine an archetypal comic hero, and you will likely picture some combination of spandex, a cape, external underpants, and a nifty set of superpowers. But for past generations, this would not necessarily have been the case.

    READ MORE
  • The Vampyre’s Legacy, Part 3: Deconstructing the Vampire

    The Vampyre’s Legacy, Part 3: Deconstructing the Vampire0

    We have seen how, in the first half of the nineteenth century, vampire fiction was pioneered by John Polidori and elaborated upon by later writers. These explorations continued into the century’s latter half as authors placed the vampire under the microscope, poking and prodding their specimens to work out exactly what the literary vampire represented.

    READ MORE
  • The Vampyre’s Legacy, Part 2: The Feminine Touch

    The Vampyre’s Legacy, Part 2: The Feminine Touch0

    As the decades passed, more writers tried their hands at the vampire genre that had been established by Lord Byron and John Polidori. In the process, they came up with new concepts and new approaches. One area in which vampire literature diversified was in terms of gender. Polidori and Byron were men, as were their

    READ MORE