Author: Doris V. Sutherland

Capes and Guts: DC House of Horror

DC House of Horror #1 Keith Giffen, Edward Lee, Mary SanGiovanni, Bryan Smith, Brian Keene, Nick Cutter, Ronald Malfi, Wrath James White and Weston Ochse (Writers), Howard Porter, Bilquis Evely, Kyle Baker, Rags Morales, Scott Kolins, Dale Eaglesham, Tom Raney and Howard Chaykin (Artists), H-Fi, Mat Lopes, Lovern Kindzierski, Romulo Fajardo Jr, Jordan Boyd, Gina Going-Raney, Wil Quintana (Colours), Rob Leigh, Taylor Esposito, Kyle Baker, Wes Abbott, Josh Reed, Pat Brosseau, Sal Cipriano and Ken Bruzenak (Letters) DC Comics October 2017 What if Superman were a murderous alien monster, or Captain Marvel the result of demonic possession? What would...

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Before Lugosi: Vampires of the Silent Screen

With his slick black hair, Hungarian accent, suave costume and penetrating glare, Bela Lugosi emerged as the definitive screen vampire after starring in Universal’s 1931 film of Dracula. The actors who played Count Dracula afterward, such as Christopher Lee and Gary Oldman, sometimes homaged Lugosi and sometimes subverted him, but they always performed in his shadow. That said, Bela Lugosi was not the first of the screen vampires. While he and Universal established an archetype in 1931, other actors, directors and studios had crafted their own, quite distinct takes on the vampire theme in the years beforehand… The Origins of...

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British Horror Comics Live Again: Scream! & Misty Halloween Special

Scream! & Misty Halloween Special Guy Adams, Gráinne McEntee, The Feek, Kek-W, Hannah Berry and Alec Worley (Writers), John Stokers, Frazer Irving, Tristan Jones, Henry Flint, Simon Coleby, Len O’Grady, Ben Willsher and DaNi (Artists), Simon Bowland, SG, Jim Campbell, Annie Parkhouse and Max Smith (Letters) Rebellion October 2017 In its heyday, the British comics industry pumped out anthologies on a weekly basis, filling newsagent shelves with knockabout comedy, daring space adventures, gung-ho war stories, and swoon-inducing romance. And, sometimes, horror. Of course, popular consciousness still remembered the moral panics that ensued after American horror comics arrived in Britain during...

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Women In British Animation: Gillian Lacey

“When the Leeds workshop started there was very little challenging animation being done and as a result there was always an excited audience waiting to see what the next films would be.” —Gillian Lacey No discussion about the history of women in British animation would be complete without a mention of Gillian Lacey. Although her filmography is not particularly expansive, and her more recent work has moved away from cartooning, hers is nonetheless one of the strongest feminist voices to have been heard within UK animation. Gillian Lacey entered the animation world as a beneficiary of the British Film...

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2017 Dragon Awards Are No Longer Puppy Awards

This weekend saw the second iteration of the Dragon Awards, a cross-media celebration of science fiction and fantasy held by Dragon Con in Atlanta. Decided through a free online poll, the awards purport to represent the tastes of SF/F fandom as a whole. Despite their recent vintage, the Dragon Awards already have a rocky history. Last year, the awards largely reflected the tastes of a very specific voting bloc: namely, supporters of the Sad Puppies and Rabid Puppies campaigns that formed to counter perceived left-wing bias at Worldcon’s Hugo Awards. This led to such ludicrous situations as Brian Niemeier, a Puppy-aligned author,...

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