REVIEW: Reptil #4 Looks Toward The Future

Paco Medina and Federico Blee’s cover for Reptil #4 by writer Terry Blas, penciler Enid Balám, inker Victor Olazaba, colorist Carlos Lopez, and letterer Joe Sabino feature image depicting Reptil running with dinosaurs

Following Reptil #1, #2, and #3, the fourth and final issue of the miniseries has Humberto Lopez fight with his family, fully embrace his superpowers, and look toward the future.

Reptil #4

Enid Balám (penciler), Terry Blas (writer), Carlos Lopez (colorist), Paco Medina and Federico Blee (cover), Victor Olazaba (inker), VC’s Joe Sabino (letterer)
Marvel Comics
September 22, 2021

Paco Medina and Federico Blee’s cover for Reptil #4 by writer Terry Blas, penciler Enid Balám, inker Victor Olazaba, colorist Carlos Lopez, and letterer Joe Sabino

Reptil #4 opens like the series did, on Humberto and his family: his grandfather, aunt, and twin cousins (Eva and Julian). After a few pages with too much dialogue, there’s a costume change for the teenagers. Humberto and Eva put on outfits that Julian has made for them: the former his supersuit, with an amulet on full display, and the latter her red, white, and green dress, which she dances in at the festival. Julian shaves his head and dresses in a complementary all-green outfit. In the absence of real-time aging, their costume changes effectively signal the growth that they’ve undergone together.

Panels from Reptil #4 by writer Terry Blas, penciler Enid Balám, inker Victor Olazaba, colorist Carlos Lopez, and letterer Joe Sabino

Eva has become a better magic user than when her powers were first teased. She creates a sword for Julian to wield when they team up with Humberto against Sarsen (son of the Hag of the Pits and Big Bad revealed in the penultimate issue) and protects civilians with a forcefield that lets humans out while keeping dinosaurs in. Julian’s sword and Eva’s forcefield glow orange, resonating with Humberto’s amulet and dinosaur forms. In the standout splash page in this issue, Humberto manages to go what Julian calls “full dino” in front of Eva’s magic. Despite taking up most of the page in an offensive stance (beak and wings open), he does so to protect his family and community, echoing the first issue’s splash page. And he successfully maintains control, which allows him to not only turn into a dinosaur but, in a neat addition to his powerset that further demonstrates his character development, also communicate with them.

Panel from Reptil #4 by writer Terry Blas, penciler Enid Balám, inker Victor Olazaba, colorist Carlos Lopez, and letterer Joe Sabino depicting Reptil in dino form

Balám’s dinosaurs are almost like scientific illustrations. Apart from their occasional overlap as Humberto changes from one to another and their color, for which Lopez deserves plenty of credit, they would not look out of place in an encyclopedia. Balám, Olazaba, and Lopez’s human figures are less meticulously rendered, but still dynamic and capable of showing emotion, from the serenity on Humberto’s face when he goes to transform to the excited smile Julian makes when he sees someone texting a certain spider-themed superhero.

The splash page from the first issue, where Reptil manifests a dinosaur’s tail to defend a child from a supervillain’s attack, remains my favorite part of the series. With just one sound effect and one speech balloon, it perfectly communicated the values of the comic’s hero and creative team. It made me wish they got more than just these four issues, and I don’t mean a few pages in an anthology one-shot. While I’m looking forward to seeing (new and old favorites) Reptil, Spider-Man, and Nova in Marvel Voices: Comunidades, I hate that the publisher isn’t committing to ongoing runs for characters or creators of marginalized identities, especially those of color.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Close
Menu