Previously on Comics: Regarding Brandon Graham — Again

Previously on Comics: Regarding Brandon Graham — Again

*taps mic* Hello? Hi! I am Wendy, your friendly neighbourhood publisher, stepping into my very first comics industry news post for WWAC. I'd like to believe that the comics industry would take it easy on my for my first go at this, but alas. Unbeknownst to me when I decided to join our intrepid team of

*taps mic* Hello? Hi! I am Wendy, your friendly neighbourhood publisher, stepping into my very first comics industry news post for WWAC. I’d like to believe that the comics industry would take it easy on my for my first go at this, but alas. Unbeknownst to me when I decided to join our intrepid team of news people, there is an unspoken rule that every one of us has to write about Brandon Graham at least once. How unfortunate for me — and far more so for the people whom he has harassed, that he is at it again with his disturbing boundary issues.

Chuck Wendig was the face of The Daily Beast’s piece on Marvel not standing behind its vulnerable creators. Though not a vulnerable creator himself, Wendig, an ALL CAPS, extremely vocal, abrasive, and vulgar, progressive, combative social media presence long before he wrote the Star Wars: Aftermath trilogy and Marvel comics, was fired by Marvel earlier this fall for being an ALL CAPS, extremely vocal, abrasive, and vulgar, progressive, combative social media presence. Our own CP Hoffman is quoted in the piece, noting that several other Marvel creators have similarly voiced their opinions on social media, but received no repercussions:

“Having a loose or non-existent social media policy tends to favor those who are well-connected within the system and hurt those who are seen as outsiders, whether they be writers coming in from another medium like Wendig…or individuals subject to racism and misogyny. While established white men at Marvel can more or less say or do what they want on social media, others do not have that luxury.”

Continuing with the comics are a trashfire theme and speaking of a glaring lack of repercussions, Marvel Comics is approaching a big anniversary as C.B. Cebulski, aka Akira Yoshida,  rounds out a year as editor-in-chief.

Uncanny X-Men #1 is out next week. Lest Marvel confuse us yet again with its new (old?) titles, our Claire called in some support to help understand exactly what this anthology entails.

DC intends to expand its Black Label imprint to include classic titles like Ronin, All-Star Superman, and Watchmen. Reprinting the classics is great, but DC has already shown that they can’t handle Batman’s lil wayne. Are they going to censor Mr. Manhattan in all his glory?

Okay, okay. Comics isn’t all bad, and I’m not going to leave my first Previously with a sad face. Not when The Korea Society in New York is hosting Women on Manhwa: The Future of Korean Comics, featuring Narae Lee (BloodySweet) and Kyungran Park (Imitation).

Creator Resource continues to provide a wealth of information, most recently compiling a list of retailers that will sell indie comics.

If watching Grant Morrison’s Happy! made you happy, then you might be even happier to learn that his deal with Universal Cable Productions has expanded to include The Invisibles.

Twenty years after its last publication, Drawn & Quarterly has collected Julie Doucet’s Dirty Plotte, featuring the first twelve issues as well as some never before published pieces.

The mysterious Writer X who wrote Marvel’s nine-issue series called The Brotherhood back in 2001 has finally been revealed.

Love AmeriKate? Then Jeremy Whitley has a treat for you with his share of a script that didn’t make it into Secret Wars: Secret Love.

And this is pretty cool:

 

Wendy Browne
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