Series: Cook Your Comics

Annie Bulloch’s Cook Your Comics: Ma Hunkel and Cake Comforts

When I was originally preparing to write this column, the women-in-comics community suddenly was besieged with what seemed like an usual number of dispiriting incidents. In the worst example, Janelle Asselin was subjected to a week of horrific threats and attacks online because she expressed an opinion about a comic book cover. Gross anti-fangirl merchandise was spotted at a con. Conventions expressed hostile attitudes toward cosplayers who just wanted to feel safe and welcome. And so on. I looked at the front page of this site in the middle of all that and tweeted, “My next food column for...

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Cook Your Comics: Themysciran Daggers and Lady Blackhawk’s Buffalo Chicken Dip

Comics in the Kitchen Annie Bulloch serves up the first of–hopefully–many themed recipes on WWAC! I love cooking, and I love comics. When I can combine the things I love, I seize the opportunity. And sometimes I do it in public. I’ve been a geek for many years, to the extent that I now own a comic shop. Sadly, I have wandered into a few comic shops that had apparently never seen a woman enter before–and hoped never to see such a thing again. I definitely wanted to fight that stereotype with our own shop, and our mission is to give women and girls (and everyone else) a fun shop where they feel safe and welcome. Last year, I hosted the first in a semi-regular series of Ladies Night events at our shop. It’s a chance for us womenfolk to get together, celebrate the greatness of being a geeky girl, and see how not-alone we are. I hoped it might appeal to women who were just curious about comics and games as well. I didn’t set a formal agenda, so we had a relaxed, party vibe. We set up displays to spotlight work by female comic creators and books starring female characters. Attendees could play games, browse our displays and take advantage of special deals, and chat with the other ladies. I find that the snack table is a...

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Annie Bulloch’s Cook Your Comics: Captain America Can See Paradise by the Oven Light

Comics in the Kitchen: Captain America Needs Meatloaf and Apple Pie With Captain America: The Winter Soldier opening, I was thinking about Steve Rogers. Before he was Captain America, he was a sickly kid living through the Great Depression. Most families were lucky to have food at all, so I imagine he still appreciates a good, simple meal when many of us might take it for granted. My great-grandfather was young during the Depression, one of 11 siblings being raised by their mother after their father abandoned the family. He used to tell me how they mostly got by on beans and potatoes, and meat and fruit were some of the rarest luxuries. So if Steve came to my house for Sunday dinner, I’d want to serve a meal that would be comfortable and familiar, but very much a treat: meatloaf and mashed potatoes, with apple pie for dessert (we’ll save the pie recipe for another time). And what’s more American than that? Some people have an aversion to meatloaf because they associate it with a mass of mystery ingredients covered in a burnt-ketchup film. That’s not what we have here. Last summer, I traveled around the western U.S. and tried some excellent meatloaves in places where they know their beefy comfort food. I knew then that I needed to step up my home-cooking game, and set out to create...

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Cook Your Comics: A World-Saving Breakfast Battle Plan

What if I said you could save the world from certain doom just by making breakfast? Is that why they say it’s the most important meal of the day? Probably. I’ve arrived at this hypothesis after years of reading comics, which is obviously the best way to gain accurate information about the world around us. Bonus: you can make it for dinner and it’s just as good. I first noticed the world-saving breakfast phenomenon when I read Mike Mignola’s two-page Hellboy story, “Pancakes.” Take 90 seconds and read the entire tale: All it took to keep Hellboy on Team...

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Cook Your Comics: Lumberjanes Dinner in Foil

In April 1986, I was nine years old. I lived in San Angelo, out in West Texas. I was a  member of a Camp Fire Boys and Girls troop, which is an inclusive scouting organization for both boys and girls. One Friday, my Camp Fire troop trekked out to a campground in the wilderness to meet other troops from all over the region for a one-night jamboree. We set up our tents, went canoeing, and when it started to get dark, we gathered by the campfire where the chaperones had dinner waiting. Each of us got a foil packet...

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