Author: Melissa Brinks

Long Lost: Dark and Hauntingly Beautiful Horror

Long Lost  Matthew Erman (Story), Lisa Sterle (Art, cover) Scout Comics November 2017 Long Lost doesn’t look like a horror comic. What sticks in my memory is not the gruesome imagery, nor the dark robes of whatever mysterious figure is haunting sisters Piper and Frances, but the sisters themselves–their facial expressions, the amount of personality we get from even their brief introduction, and their individual styles of dress, which are just as important to how we perceive them as the words they say. Eerie imagery and dread are all important, but it means little if we don’t feel that...

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Hella Big Shoes To Fill: Deck Nine Games’ Zak Garriss on Life is Strange: Before the Storm

Life is Strange is one of the breakout hits of 2015. Brought to you by Dontnod, the creators of Remember Me, Life is Strange put players in control of Max Caulfield, a teenager with time-travel powers, as she navigates returning to her hometown in the midst of a Twin Peaks-esque mystery. Life is Strange: Before the Storm, the upcoming prequel, dispenses with most of that. There are no time travel powers, no Max Caulfield, no Dontnod, and, most notably, no Ashly Burch, the voice of fan-favorite character Chloe. Fans of the series loved the game’s earnest and sometimes strange...

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Dissecting The Dream Daddy Discourse

There’s a trend I’ve noticed with more mainstream coverage of visual novels, and I’m going to be honest—I don’t like it. I’m happy games like Dream Daddy and Tusks are getting coverage. Visual novels are a vastly underrated and misunderstood genre, usually only coming to the larger games press’ attention when something weird (dating pigeons) or something controversial (Ladykiller in a Bind’s pulled scene) happens. And when they are covered, as with the recent popularity of Dream Daddy, there’s a distinct trend to paint them as a surprising success. I realize that visual novels, and more specifically dating sims,...

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Emojiam Combines The Beauty of Emojis With The Challenge of Quick Game Design

Emojiam has a simple premise: make a game in seven days based on a design document written in emojis. Participants were free to interpret the document as they wished, skipping some sections if desired, so long as the game was in some way inspired by the document. The result is 19 fresh new games, all of which offer unique spins on the design document and demonstrate the individual talents and aspirations of each designer. We divvied up the games between the two of us, except for the two multiplayer games and Hot Water, because only one of us has...

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Remakes, Remasters, and the Myth of Gamer Illegitimacy

I often say that I’ve been playing games since I was a toddler, but that’s a lie. I grew up poor; we didn’t have money for luxuries like video games and especially not consoles, so while I trained my thumbs on Super Mario Bros. and spent countless hours exploring Donkey Kong Country, after that everything gets a bit spotty. If I were anybody else, I’d ask, “who cares?” You’re a gamer if you play games, full stop. It has nothing to do with how long you’ve played or what games you’ve played or whether you’ve gotten every heart container...

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