Author: Kayleigh Hearn

News & Things: “KANEDAAA!”

Welecome back to News & Things! Today we have a lot of manga, anime, and animanga news to share. For some reason. Kickstarter of the Week World War Kaiju! No we’re not talking about Pacific Rim. World War Kaiju is a graphic novel celebrating the kaiju genre and asks the question, “What would happen if we used monsters to fight wars instead of bombs?” World War Kaiju is the brainchild of Josh Finney (Titanium Rain, Utopiates), Kat Rocha (01Publishing), and artist Patrick McEvoy (Call of Cthulhu, Game of Thrones). Having already raised $20,266, the project has surpassed its original $15,000 goal, but you can still get in on the giant monster action. Check out some preview art below: Read of the Week Catching Fire costumer Trish Summerville did a Q&A with Nuzhat Naoreen of Entertainment weekly: “[S]ome of the looks in [Catching Fire] are pretty intense, very colorful, so that was great fun because it took me completely into another world that’s not particularly my aesthetic. I like a lot of muted tones and unsaturated, washed out… and that was great because it propelled my mind to think in a really different manner because it is quite over the top. It’s kind of futuristic, but it’s not sci-fi on any level. It’s really bold and really colorful and quite campy at times, then it gets really serious. I tried to bring a little...

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News & Things: News of Future Past

Welcome back to News & Things. This is Kayleigh, your intrepid reporter for the week, and I’m thrilled to be joining the WWAC team. Enjoy, won’t you? Kickstarter of the Week The Choosatron: Interactive Fiction Arcade Machine by Jerry Belich The Choosatron is an “interactive fiction game box,” where the decisions you make determine the outcome of a sharable, printed story. A homage to fondly-remembered Choose Your Own Adventure games, the Choosatron is Wi-Fi connected and features story contributions by a number of creators. Read of the Week On her blog, Seanan McGuire talks about San Diego Comic-Con, the myth of the Fake Geek Girl, and the double standards in demanding to see a fan’s “credentials.” Seanan says, “Men—adult men—have asked me to defend my knowledge of and right to be a fan of My Little motherfucking Pony. My first fandom, the fandom that is arguably responsible for getting me into epic fantasy (not kidding), the franchise that I have publicly credited with teaching me how to plot long-term. A franchise that was, at least originally, aimed exclusively at little girls who enjoyed ponies and hair-play. I think that all fandoms should be for everyone, and I love that My Little Pony has finally found a male audience, but are you kidding here? Are you seriously telling me that the second men discover something I have loved since I...

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(late) Summer Reading

Summer reading lists usually come out in late spring, early summer. Just as you’re starting to dream of a cold drink on a hot afternoon (or consuming your body weight in liquid, while being submerged in liquid, as one does). This ain’t no ordinary summer reading list though, it’s specifically, a late summer reading list, for those of us exiled to dog-day vacations. Fall is just around the corner, and if you aren’t still getting hit by torrential rains, the local flora is at its biggest, just about ready to give up the ghost. So as you eke out...

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Marvel Roundtable–part two

Mary Jane, Miles, and the diversity dance in comics. Megan Purdy In part one of WWAC’s Marvel Roundtable, I talked to Skalja of @#$% Yeah, Spider-Wife!, Corrina Lawson of Geek Mom, RonchRonchRonch, and webcomic creator Indigo, about romance, mental health, and motherhood. In part two, we talk about Superior Spider-Man, Ultimate Spider-Man, and more generally, about disposable youth characters as a convenient vehicle for diversity. I think it’s important to note that in the weeks since we got together for this roundtable, two of the DC characters mentioned in passing regarding diversity in the Big Two  have been killed off (Damian Wayne) and rumoured to be killed off in coming issues (John Stewart). Did we jinx them? Keep a close eye on Luke and Misty, in case they’re next! * * * Mary Jane Watson has had a hard time of it in the last few years. These days she’s stuck in a weird body-swap story with Doc Ock. It’s interesting that Marvel has put so much story-telling weight on her shoulders, and in doing so acknowledged her importance to Spider-Man, while also, in the past, disavowing her in-story importance to Spider-Man. What’s going on here? And how could Marvel do better by the character and her fans? Indigo: I was dubious about the MJ story in Superior Spider-Man, but I’m going to say I’m actually very impressed with...

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State of Marvel Roundtable–Part One

Marvel romance, mental health, and motherhood. Megan Purdy Bendis is off Avengers! Marvel’s partnering with Disney-owned Hyperion to put out romance novels! Miles Morales is super popular! It’s a (brand new) day! Maybe. With Captain Marvel, Fearless Defenders, the all female X-Men, and the upcoming She-Hulk and Rogue romance novels, Marvel is putting its female characters at the forefront. They also recently brought back Jan, teased us with the return of Jean Grey, gave us actual baby!Jean Grey, and have stuck Mary-Jane at the center of a creepy Spider-Man story. For longtime Marvel readers, this probably won’t seem all that remarkable: for at least the past ten years, the company has gone through regular cycles of All The Lady Comics, and then… not. So if the focus on female characters isn’t remarkable, what sets this stuff apart? I talked to longtime Marvel zombies Skalja of @#$% Yeah, Spider-Wife!, Corrina Lawson of Geek Mom, RonchRonchRonch, and webcomic creator Indigo about this Marvel moment. * * * Marvel wants in on the lucrative romance market, and is going to test the waters with She-Hulk and Rogue novels. Lest we forget Marvel Divas (oh dears), this isn’t the first time Marvel has made a foray into the ‘female’ market. Will these original novels succeed where Divas failed, and failed hard? Should these novels succeed? What, in your opinion, is the key to...

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