Author: Jazmine Joyner

Remixing the Classics: Hideo Furukawa’s Novella Slow Boat

Slow Boat Hideo Furukawa Pushkin Press June 6, 2017 A review copy was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. The novella Slow Boat by Hideo Furukawa is, in his words, a remix. He states, “To take your love for the original and situate it in the present,” and he does exactly that with Slow Boat.  A nod to Haruki Murakami’s extraordinary short story, A Slow Boat to China, Furukawa takes the original story of a man having three encounters with Chinese people  and puts it into a more contemporary setting. Slow Boat centers on a man’s attempt to leave...

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Real Life Horror Inspiring Fiction: Comic Review of Destroyer by Victor LaValle

Victor LaValle’s Destroyer #1 Victor LaValle (Writer), Dietrich Smith (Artist), Micaela Dawn (Cover Artist) Boom! Studios May 24, 2017 Victor LaValle’s horror comic Destroyer is a six-issue series that is a new take on the Frankenstein mythos. The story is about a grieving mother and scientist who lost her son to a police shooting, who is now working tirelessly to bring him back. All the while Dr. Frankenstein’s original creature seeks to destroy humankind. At the core, this horror story is an allegory on grief, loss, and humanity. Dr. Baker is destroyed by her son Akai’s death and does everything in...

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Visionary Comics: Black Girl Magic is Spreading

Ariell R. Johnson of Amalgam Comics & Coffeehouse in Philadelphia and Jazmine Joyner co-owner of Visionary Comics in Riverside California–we are two sides of one coin. The two black women in America who own comic book shops. Ariell is the beautiful black, able-bodied goddess floating from an interview, to a commercial, to a con. In her sprawling fantastic comic shop/coffeehouse Amalgam, she is the face of comics we all want. She even has her likeness on an Invincible Ironman cover. This alt-black girl with colorful locks and a gorgeous smile is the embodiment of black excellence. In contrast, I’m afraid...

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How Wondercon Failed Disabled Attendees

Comic conventions are an odd thing, either exciting hubs of creative minds or giant airplane carriers full of people trying to sell you stuff. Either way you feel, what cannot be argued is their existence. There are conventions almost every weekend of 2017, and on certain weekends, there are seven or eight at the same time. So, with something this popular and widespread, you’d assume that they would be desperate for all fans to come and spend their hard-earned money and precious time within their walls. Well, no. Conventions have a huge accessibility problem. I have never been to...

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