Author: J. A. Micheline

A Weekend at MoCCAFest

The last time I went to MoCCAFest, it was in the 69th Regiment Armory, on Lexington Ave between 25th and 26th. The building is old and solid, red brick and wood, unique and unmistakable, like the comics I found in it. I came across the show accidentally in 2012 and then returned on purpose in 2013. And then I missed a few years. I keep trying to find this quote (perhaps it was a riff off Colson Whitehead’s post-9/11 essay, Lost and Found), but it goes something like this: “You haven’t really lived somewhere until you can remember what...

Read More

Cover Girl: Island #15 by Dilraj Mann

This month, the Cover Girl team has convened to discuss the cover of Island #15, by Dilraj Mann, from Image Comics. It hits stores on February 8, 2017. What is your initial reaction to this as a piece of art? (Who is it for? What does it say?) Clara Mae: I’m having conflicting feelings about this one. I love the colors, the crisp lines on the shirt, and the little details on the jewelry. But I’m not entirely sure who this is for. Please correct me if I’m wrong, but I believe this artist is Asian, not black? If the artist...

Read More

Comic Arts Brooklyn 2016: A Nice Thing to Have

Comic Arts Brooklyn is for one-day only–blink and you miss it. It’s set up in a basketball court in Williamsburg’s The Shrine Church of Our Lady of Mount Carmel. Without the heaps of people streaming in and out or sitting outside on the stairs, you might think it’s a school. It’s more boxy than it is spired and not what comes to mind when picturing a Catholic church. But this is appropriate, because churches are schools anyway and art’s not all that different from religion. The show is two levels–the upstairs is the basketball court proper and the downstairs...

Read More

A Right to Be Hostile: The Boondocks in 2016

It’s been twenty years since Aaron McGruder’s daily comic strip, The Boondocks, first appeared on Hitline.com in 1996. It’s been ten years since it ended, after being syndicated in over 300 U.S. newspapers and transformed into a successful animated TV show. Twenty years since it started, ten years since it ended and–not much has changed. Yeah, sure, an oppressive regime unlike any previously seen on American soil is about to take power, but the gap between where we were before and where we are now is likely smaller than most think. As many marginalized people know, we have been...

Read More

Black Heroism and “The Man” in Luke Cage

So now—Luke Cage is a hero. The arc of his heroism passes from the (messy) pilot into the end of the fourth episode, when he announces to the press that his name is Luke Cage. For some reason, I suppose. On the one hand, the rationale for his involvement with Cottonmouth is quite clear: Cottonmouth was indirectly responsible for Pop’s murder. He is grieving, feeling as though he must do something to make this right, and as such makes it his mission to hit Cottonmouth where it hurts–his cash. Even though I feel Colter’s acting left much to be...

Read More