Book Beat: They Can’t Kill Us All

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Hello all, Stephanie here again!  I was excited to find that there’s been a lot going on in the book and publishing industry this past week surrounding female authors, writers, and characters, particularly black women. Let’s get into it!

In YA book news, the second book in Daniel Jose Older’s Shadowshaper Cypher series, Shadowhouse Fall, came out on Tuesday and production on the movie adaptation of The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas started last week! Both books feature black teenage girls as the main protagonist. Interested? You can read the WWAC reviews of book one in the Shadowshaper Cypher series here and The Hate U Give here.

Meanwhile AMC has started development on the adaptation of Washington Post reporter, Wesley Lowry’s nonfiction book They Can’t Kill Us All. They Can’t Kill Us All covers racially-biased policing and the beginning of the Black Lives Matter movement. It is only right and fair then that AMC’s adaptation be c0-produced by LaToya Morgan who produced and wrote for TV shows Into the Badlands and Turn: Washington’s Spies.

Moving on from L.A. to Silicon Valley, Ellen Pao, the junior venture capital partner who filed a gender discrimination suit against her then-employer venture firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers in 2012, is releasing a book next Tuesday, September 19th, detailing her failed lawsuit and the ensuing fallout and impact on her and her family. Titled Reset, the book also goes into Pao’s late foreway into intersectional feminism and reluctance to become the new face of feminism in Silicon Valley. Though Pao may lament earlier compromises and cooperation, it sounds like Reset is a whole different kind of narrative. Better late than never, I say, and bring it on!

Ellen Pao by Brian Flaherty for The New York Times

Ellen Pao by Brian Flaherty for The New York Times

Finally coming back to fiction, Swedish author David Lagercrantz’s The Girl Who Takes an Eye for an Eye, a continuation of Stieg Larsson’s Millenium series that started with The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (originally Män som hatar kvinnorMen Who Hate Women in Sweden), came out last week.  The Girl Who Takes an Eye for an Eye will be Lagercrantz’s second book in the Millenium series after publisher Norstest contracted him to continue the series after Larsson’s death. I’ve only read Larsson’s Millenium books, but if The GIrl Who Takes an Eye for an Eye really covers racism, religious fundamentalism, and government conspiracy as Paste Magazine mentions, Lagercrantz is certainly following in Larsson’s anti-authoritarian shoes.

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About Author

Queer, 20-something intersectional feminist, Vietnamese-American, and born fangirl. Writes about anything geeky and thinks about food too much. You can find Stephanie's Twitter rants at @YouAndYourEgo.

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