Sometimes the fandom makes me think of a pattern, and sometimes it’s the yarn.

I was walking the aisles at Jo-Ann’s when I saw this yarn:

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The lighting in this pic doesn’t quite convey the way that orange-y yarn has a bronzed sheen, but hopefully it’s still enough to explain why I immediately thought of Harry Potter and Harry Potter scarves, which was one impetus for this month’s Knit Your Comics.

See, I love Harry Potter. I actually learned to knit specifically to knit Harry Potter scarves. Which is why as soon as I saw these colors next to each other, I couldn’t help but think about them in Ravenclaw blue and bronze terms. Hence…a Ravenclaw scarf–but a little more grown up, because I’m a little more grown up now. In theory. And even though I’m not a Ravenclaw, a friend of mine is, and the second impetus for this project was the fact that it’s the time of the year when I’m looking for quick projects I can knit for presents that won’t break my wallet.

The third impetus for this project was that I love the look of crocheted colorwork, but I absolutely cannot crochet, so when I was browsing interesting stitches for my Ravenclaw scarf, and I found this stitch pattern, I was immediately struck by how it looked like crochet but was actually knit. Which is why this pattern is called:

I Can’t Believe It’s Not Crocheted Two-Color Star Stitch Cowl

The Yarn

It’s a thicker yarn, technically classified as medium like other worsted yarns, but is more like a bulky and is knit on 6.0 MM size 10 needles. It also has a single ply and a gorgeous, lustrous sheen, and is 100% acrylic which means WASHABLE AND NOT ITCHY. I seriously can’t say enough good things about this yarn.

The Pattern

This is probably the easiest pattern I’ve designed so far and requires only the knowledge of:

  • How to do the knit stitch
  • How to pass over stitches
  • How to make stitches
  • How to knit in the round

Therefore it gets a B for Basic on the difficulty scale I came up with last month.

This stitch is basically the Closed Star stitch that I linked to above, but knit in the round, so it works in multiples of three.

Cast on 90 stitches in the round on a 16” 6.0 mm (Size 10) circular needle.

Row 1: With Color A. K2 (the last stitch of the round will be passed over these two stitches), K3, pass first of the 3 knit stitches over the 2nd and 3rd stitches. Repeat around until last stitch. Knit final stitch, then pass over the first two stitches of the round.

Row 2: With Color B, pick up yarn between the stitch just worked and the next stitch and knit. (Basically, M1), K2. Repeat until last stitch.

Row 3: With Color B, K2, (the last stitch of the round will be passed over these two stitches), K3, pass first of the 3 knit stitches over the 2nd and 3rd stitches. Knit final stitch, then pass over the first two stitches of the round.

Row 4: With Color A, pick up yarn between the stitch just worked and the next stitch and knit. (Basically, M1), K2. Repeat until last stitch.

Repeat rows 1-4 8 more times (or as many times as you want) ending on a Row 1 with Color A.

Cast off row: With color A, pick up yarn between the stitch just worked and the next stitch and knit (basically, M1), K1, so there are two stitches on the needle, pass second stitch over the first stitch to bind off loosely, repeat.

You may need to block the cowl, or at the very least run it through the washer and let it air dry. A finished blocked cowl measures a little over 12” and 6” wide.

One thing to note about doing this stitch in the round the way I’ve described is that the yarn will travel along the back side, and your starting and finishing points will not be in the same place. This is totally normal. You are doing it right if the wrong side of your scarf looks like this.

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Final Thoughts

And that’s it. You’re done with another holiday gift, and it only took you a couple days to do it (if you’re like me and knit for a few hours a day). Even if you only did one of the pattern repeats a day you’d be done in about a week. Fair warning that you may be so inspired that you knit a movie Ravenclaw version for your friend and keep the book Ravenclaw version for yourself.

Also, the best thing about this colorwork stitch pattern is that there are endless possibilities, and it’s a fantastic potential stash-busting project. For example…what if you just happened to have some leftover yarn from a Captain Marvel hat you knit nearly a year ago?

Yeah, that looks pretty amazing.

And is this a Slytherin version, or a new scarf to wear to a Dallas Stars hockey game?

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bothisgood

Happy Holidays and good knitting!