The Thursday Book Beat: Love Triangles To Threesomes In YA

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Yet another Ardo takeover of the Thursday Book Beat this week. Let’s check out some book news.

The Great Leap In Logic: Love Triangles To Threesomes In YA

Writer Allen Salkin makes the claim that “young adult books are getting hotter with threesomes” as the latest trend in the popular book market. This entire piece is misleading and poorly researched but let’s break it down, shall we? Salkin claims that YA is full of threesome sexual action but only provides one example at best. The others are: a fingering scene (Althea & Oliver), a male protagonist struggling between two loves which consist of his girlfriend and his best friend with no threesome mentioned (Cut Both Ways), a sixteen year old boy thinking about threesomes (Grasshopper Jungle), and two female friends who fall for one another until one of them falls for a guy (Dirty Wings). I haven’t read any of these books – he happen to choose the ones I haven’t! – but as a reader of this article, he hasn’t provided me with any real example of a threesome save for two examples he gave in Fans of the Impossible Life and 99 Days. Love triangles and threesomes are NOT the same. A love triangle is often one person being in love with two people and those two people are in love with that same individual. They don’t all get into bed together and have sex which is what a threesome is (three people having sex with each other at the same time).

Salkin also doesn’t seem to understand bisexuality in the case of Dirty Wings and Cut Both Ways where the love triangle involves that one person being in love with two people of different gender identities which doesn’t equate a threesome. I also find it interesting that Salkin talks about the sexing up of young adult books as being encouraged given the current landscape when it comes to sex and teens. Teens are still being taught abstinence in their sex ed classes in the United States and in some places, condom demonstrations are banned. Many young adult books have been banned on the basis of sex among other things: Courtney Summers’ Some Girls Are, Rainbow Rowell’s Eleanor and Park,  Stephen Chbosky’s The Perks of Being a Wallflower and many more. Most people who read YA are fine with sex in YA because young adults have sex. They had sex ten years ago. They had sex fifty years ago. This concept isn’t new and to treat the idea that this very normal activity among teens is treated without any blow back in YA is untrue as proven above. Frankly, Salkin’s title may allude to the specific sexual activity of threesomes but the actual piece itself is just a generic look at sex in YA. Is there more of it? Yes, because society is slowly getting more and more comfortable in discussing it overall. Are YA being written for adults as Salkin suggests? I think given that YA is written by adults, published by adults and sold by adults that it has always been targeted at what teens might teens of the present will like and respond to according their experience. To summarize: Try again, Salkin.

BookRiot Lists 11 YA Books That Tackle Intersectional Feminism

Kelly Jensen has written a great list of books that are great examples of intersectional feminism. I highly suggest checking it out because 1) intersectional feminism is important and 2) these books are great. A book that’s not on the list is Alaya Dawn Johnson’s Love Is The Drug which I loved and also highly recommend.

The Notebook Will Be A Television Show

WHYYYYYYYYYY????

Ernest Cline’s Gets Mid Seven Figure Deal For Next Book

Book Store Campaigns For Joan Didion To Be On The $10 Bill

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About Author

Former senior editor for WWAC. Part-time contributor. BA in criminals (a minor in daydreams). Batman seeks her advice constantly. Bylines at Book Riot, Teen Vogue, Slate, Quill & Quire and Hyperallergic.

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